Accessories speak louder than words

Image from: http://verymerryvintagestyle.blogspot.com

By now most of you know that what clothes you wear at the office and to an interview give your coworkers and the interviewer insight into who you are. We’ve previously talked about the dress code at the office and what additional items to bring with you to an interview. But what about your accessories?

According to this Daily Worth article, these seemingly tiny details add up. Diamond studs and a classic watch convey classy, quiet power. Mixing metals and a bold color palate make you a fashionable trendsetter. Statement earrings, layered bracelets and vintage cocktail rings communicate glamor.

For men, it isn’t quite as simple. Colored or patterned socks, a creative (but subtle!) tie, cuff links, watches and belt buckles (again, subtle!) can help show your personality.

Just remember there is a fine line between tasteful and obnoxious in accessories.

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My Single Piece of Advice to 2010 Graduates (PR or not)

Photo from: Ricomoss
I’ll be the first to admit, I’ve made this mistake more than once. A few times, it has worked out well for me. Others have been total disasters.

Don’t accept the first job offer that comes your way, just because it is the first.

Think about that for a minute. Job hunting is scary. It is intimidating and isn’t easy. But trying to fit yourself into a company that doesn’t work for you or a boss with a personality that doesn’t mesh with yours is worse. Unless the position is a perfect fit and will offer you everything you want in a company, culture and in personal relationships with co-workers, it is ok to turn it down.

Yes, your parents might be disappointed and your friends might not understand, but they are not the ones who will have to work there for nine hours (or more!) a day, five (or more!) days per week.

It is perfectly fine to turn down a job you wouldn’t find the work interesting. Of if after the interview you have a gut feeling that it wouldn’t be a good fit. Don’t ignore that. Don’t just say, well it might not be so bad. You have instincts for a reason.

I was on one interview where my possible future boss, stepped on every sentence I had. She was a bit abrasive even in the interview setting. If I had listened to my gut, I would have realized that if she acts this way now, she’ll be even worse if I actually worked for her. And she was.

If I hadn’t just accepted that job off the bat and had waited just a week more, I could have accepted a job in a better environment, with a more collegial staff. I didn’t accept because I had just started a new job. I still kick myself for that.

There are many resources available to you to help decide if an offer is right for you. Just start with Google or your Help a PR Pro Out comrades. In the end, it is your choice. If it doesn’t feel like a choice, consider that a sign that it might be worth waiting for the next opportunity.

Intensity as a bad thing?

I am the first to admit, I am intense. Everything about me is intense. I am fiercely loyal and devoted. I can be amazingly smart and brilliantly stupid. I am genuinely happy and silly.

But this part of my personality is not something I let shine in all environments. I’ve gotten burned for my tenaciousness and optimism. It doesn’t always come across as professional and has made people treat me like a teenager. So I’ve learned to read a situation and work environment before letting tiny pieces of my real personality out. I try to listen more and talk less, something that is difficult for me. Read a situation better before bubbling over.

Do you squelch parts of your personality in certain situations?