Accessories speak louder than words

Image from: http://verymerryvintagestyle.blogspot.com

By now most of you know that what clothes you wear at the office and to an interview give your coworkers and the interviewer insight into who you are. We’ve previously talked about the dress code at the office and what additional items to bring with you to an interview. But what about your accessories?

According to this Daily Worth article, these seemingly tiny details add up. Diamond studs and a classic watch convey classy, quiet power. Mixing metals and a bold color palate make you a fashionable trendsetter. Statement earrings, layered bracelets and vintage cocktail rings communicate glamor.

For men, it isn’t quite as simple. Colored or patterned socks, a creative (but subtle!) tie, cuff links, watches and belt buckles (again, subtle!) can help show your personality.

Just remember there is a fine line between tasteful and obnoxious in accessories.

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What I Learned While the Boss Was Away

I learned that things will continue on as usual. People will still need your help. They’ll still ask for more than you can give.

An obvious lesson I learned is that one person cannot do the work of two, no matter how hard you try. I was lucky that my co-workers were kind enough to understand that as well. I learned that a little extra patience and a friendly conversation goes a long way.
The ability to manage your own time and keep on top of the things in your queue is a skill that I’m getting better at every time it is my responsibility. I’m proud of what I accomplished last week.

I got a little more insight into the other side of the office and how things work “over there.” I learned that proper criticism goes so much farther than tearing some one down. Everyone has a bad day, but I learned it is how you handle the next day that matters. No one wants to have a terrible day.

I know I learned more last week than this post implies about myself, my company and my co-workers. However, putting all those things into words isn’t the point. It’s the changes, no matter how subtle, that make a difference.