Faze vs. Phase: A Grammar Lesson

Image from: http://www.todayifoundout.com
Today’s grammar lesson comes from Steve Woodruff, President of Impactiviti.

He had a tweet a few weeks ago that made me laugh at first and then cringe a little as I started noticing it in various places and different contexts.

Woodruff’s tweet was, “btw, nothing will ‘phase’ you unless you are on a Star Trek set. However, something might or might not ‘faze’ you.”

Faze according to merriam-webster.com is an “alteration of feeze to drive away, frighten, from Middle English fesen, from Old English f─ôsian to drive away” as of 1830 it means “to disturb the composure of.”

Phase “is a noun or verb having to do with an aspect of something.” You can phase something in or go through a phase.

So unless you’re writing science fiction avoid using phase to mean upset.

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