The Office Food Trap

from someecards.com
from someecards.com

It doesn’t matter if you work in a newsroom, a corporate office, a non-profit or school there will always be the carry in. Some people call it a potluck. Others call it a pitch-in, bring-a-plate, dish-to-pass or any multitude of other words that all mean you bring something and have a feast.

Seems easy enough, right? You bring a dish and so do your co-workers. But that’s where it gets tricky. Some co-workers might be on a diet or are diabetic. Or can’t eat sugar substitutes. Or show their love with food or by commenting on your food choices. These landmines don’t have to be difficult.

Do what you can for your dish, the one you bring. If you love macaroni and cheese and have a fantastic recipe, make it! Don’t modify it unless you have to for yourself. That way you’ll know what goes in it and can tell your coworkers when they ask. Plus, you’ll know you can at least eat what you brought.

A note on co-workers asking what’s in the dish, it might be because they have an allergy or an intolerance or because they think the dish is so fantastic they must have the recipe. Be flattered and be kind.

You might feel obligated to take something because your boss made it, even if you already know you loathe the dish. That’s ok. Find a way to make it at least look like you tasted it. If that means cutting it up into teensy, eensy bites or hiding it under something else, fine, just be discrete.

As for an out on the whole thing all together you can always claim you forgot about the carry in, already made lunch plans or ate a huge breakfast and are stuffed. Regardless of whether or not you choose to participate, just be polite. Accept others food comments and occasional criticisms as a reflection of them, not you. Some people just show love with food.

How do you navigate the Office Food trap?

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Where to put Education on your Resume

I recently received this question, “How should I answer the question about education if I’m applying for a job before I graduate?”

The spring semester is a great time for students to update their resumes, even if they aren’t graduating in May. Any resume template will leave you a space for education and many employers require this information on an application.

Most resume advice suggests listing your education like this:
NAME OF SCHOOL, location
Degree, Date (or anticipated date)
Major
Minor
GPA (if above a 3.0.)
If your GPA is not above a 3.0, is coursework in your major above a 3.0? If yes, consider listing it like this:
3.5 Major GPA. Note: this may raise some red flags. Have a conversation with your adviser or some one in the field you are applying for to see if this is necessary (sometimes it is).

As for where to put education in your resume, that depends. Are you still in school? If yes, list your education first unless you have significant experience which directly ties to the position you are applying for. Did you just graduate? Same as above. If your degree is a requirement for the position you are applying for, you may want to list it first. It all depends on what you want to highlight. Remember to tailor your resume for each job you apply for. To summarize, read the job ad closely and make sure your resume reflects the keywords and requirements listed in the ad.

You can always include relevant courses and course work if your experience is slim or non-existent. Additionally, if you have any honors or awards, find a way to list that under education or under another section, perhaps titled Honors and Awards.

Another way to list your education and include the relevant course work.

NAME OF SCHOOL, location
Degree, Date (or anticipated date)
Major
Relevant Course Work:
Minor
Relevant Course Work:
GPA (if above a 3.0)

This article from St. Could University lists several ways to add your education to your resume.